Infrared Heat and Coronary Artery
Disease, Arteriosclerosis, and Hypertension

Infrared Heat and Coronary Artery
Disease, Arteriosclerosis, and Hypertension

Infrared Heat and Coronary Artery Disease, Arteriosclerosis, and Hypertension

Finnish researchers, reporting the regular use of conventional saunas state; “There is abundant evidence to suggest that blood vessels of regular sauna-goers remain elastic and pliable longer due to the regular dilation and contraction of blood vessels induced by regular sauna use.”


In 1989, German medical researchers reported in “Dermatol Monatsschrift” a single whole-body session of far infrared-induced hyperthermia lasting over one hour had only beneficial effects on subjects with State I and II essential hypertension. Each subject experienced a rise in core body temperature to a maximum level of 35.5°C. All of the subjects in one experiment had significant decreases in arterial, venous, and mean blood pressure that lasted for at least 24 hours and linked, according to researchers, to a persistent peripheral dilation effect. An improvement in plasma viscosity was also noted.

Another group of similar hypertensive patients was also studied under the same conditions of hyperthermia, with an eye toward more carefully evaluating the circulatory system effects induced by this type of whole-body heating. During each infrared session, there was a significant decrease of blood pressure, cardiac ejection resistance, and total peripheral resistance in every subject. There was also a significant increase of the subjects’ heart rates, stroke volumes, cardiac outputs, and ejection fractions. The researchers site these last three (3) effects as evidence that the stimulation of the heart during infrared induced hyperthermia is well compensated, while the prior list of effects show clear detail of the microcirculatory changes leading to the desired result of a lowering blood pressure. | Source: Research on Far Infrared Rays by Dr. Aaron M. Flickstein.